CPE510 Wan speeds

CPE510 Wan speeds
CPE510 Wan speeds
2019-07-11 10:30:39 - last edited 2019-07-12 00:48:40
Model: CPE510
Hardware Version: V1
Firmware Version:

Hi,

 

I have installed 2 CPE510 as a client and AP and in the remote end I'am getting 55Mbps but in the local site i'm getting 145Mbps, would the bridge scenario drop the WAN speeds by that much in the remote site?

 

Thanks

 

John 

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5 Replies
Re:CPE510 Wan speeds
2019-07-12 02:24:55

JohnEastwood08 wrote

Hi,

 

I have installed 2 CPE510 as a client and AP and in the remote end I'am getting 55Mbps but in the local site i'm getting 145Mbps, would the bridge scenario drop the WAN speeds by that much in the remote site?

 

Thanks

 

John 

The CPE 510 has a speed test tool that tests the speed between the AP and the client. You can try this tool first.

In addition,CPE510 also has a tool called Spectrum Analysis that can scan the interference of wireless signals in the environment, adjust the CPE to the appropriate Channel and choose the appropriate Channel Width according to the result of scanning.

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Re:Re:CPE510 Wan speeds
2019-07-12 09:43:54

Hi Scott,

 

Thanks for you recommendations, i will try these. noticed the CPE510 is only 100MB LAN port so im never going to exceed the download of 155Mbps. Dont suppose you know if TP-Link do the 1GB LAN Port bridge devices?

 

Thanks

 

John 

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Re: CPE510 Wan speeds
2019-07-12 11:06:40 - last edited 2019-07-12 11:43:16

JohnEastwood08 wrote

noticed the CPE510 is only 100MB LAN port so im never going to exceed the download of 155Mbps. Dont suppose you know if TP-Link do the 1GB LAN Port bridge devices?

 

CPEs achieve max. 300 Mbps WiFi speed, which equals about 210 Mbps data speed in 802.11n mode. Since WiFi is half duplex, this speed is 100 Mbps for each direction under ideal environmental conditions. Ethernet is a full duplex communication, thus a 100 Mbps interface is able to achieve 2x 100 Mbps if fully saturated.

 

Since a 100 Mbps interface can achieve 200 Mbps throughput over wires, the maximum (Ethernet) throughput of a CPE is 100 Mbps full duplex, which yields 200 Mbps in a half duplex medium. For 200 Mbps data speed the CPE needs around 300 Mbps WiFi speed. If it would have a gigabit interface, you could only use 100 Mbps full-duplex (2x 100 Mbps half duplex) anyway.

 

See this post (scroll down to the end) for real-world speeds which can be achieved with Pharos products.

 

Regarding bridge mode: bridges transmit every package they receive wirelessly, thus cutting (wireless!) bandwidth in half. Use Client and AP modes to avoid that (in Client/AP modes it's still kind of a bridge, but no wireless bridge).

 

If you need more speed and the distance is short, consider use of two EAP225-Outdoor. But they don't have directional antennas. Theoretically, you could connect any Pharos antenna (such as TL-ANT5819MS or TL-ANT5830MD) to the EAP225-Outdoor as long as the maximum EIRP allowed in your country is not exceeded, but the antennas are single-band only while the EAP225-Outdoor is a dual-band device.

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Re:Re: CPE510 Wan speeds
2019-07-15 07:52:02
Hi Guys, Went to site again on Friday to reset the CPE510's and signal strength is on point with it being 28db. Latency is up and down constantly, have any of you guys come across power lines being directly over the building interfering with the WiFi signal?
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Re:Re:Re: CPE510 Wan speeds
2019-07-17 01:03:24

JohnEastwood08 wrote

Hi Guys, Went to site again on Friday to reset the CPE510's and signal strength is on point with it being 28db. Latency is up and down constantly, have any of you guys come across power lines being directly over the building interfering with the WiFi signal?

 

In the setup for the throughput measurements referenced by my previous post, there was a power line connecting two neighbored houses directly in the line of sight between the 2x pairs of CPE510s - the power line did not interfere with the WiFi signal. However, in the near of high voltage power lines there might be notable interferences.

 

Latency over WiFi always has up and downs; it's a shared medium, meaning latency increases if the channel is used by some other device.

 

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