300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender

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300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender

This thread has been locked for further replies. You can start a new thread to share your ideas or ask questions.
300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-10-27 09:23:28 - last edited 2019-10-28 07:09:28
Model: EAP110-Outdoor  
Hardware Version:
Firmware Version:

Hi, I have set up above and have constant green light with a good signal but it goes into search on phone and then says unable to obtain ip address. What ip is it looking for and how can i rectify this. Thank you in advance. Seamus.

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-10-28 08:13:09

@columcille 

What is your network topology? What device is your DHCP-server, do you have any router (I feel like no...)?

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#2
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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-07 16:10:44
I have a sky router that i get the wifi from and trying to extend it to stables.
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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-08 14:10:18 - last edited 2019-11-08 14:22:42

 

columcille wrote

I have a sky router that i get the wifi from and trying to extend it to stables.

 

The EAP110-Outdoor does not support wireless extender modes. It's an Access Point always working in AP (aka MASTER) mode which means that it always needs to be connetced to a router or a switch by cable.

 

For a wireless bridge/WLAN extender you would need a device capable of connecting to the Sky router's AP in client (aka STA) mode, for example a Pharos CPE510. They support STA mode, albeit they are most often useful only if used pair-wise since they are designed for strictly directional links over very long distances and not for a wireless connection to an indoor AP (the CPE can do that technically, but question is whether the indoor AP can manage to send a stable WiFi signal back to the CPE).

 

If using Pharos devices for the bridge you could still use your EAP110-Outdoor for 360º WLAN coverage in your stables as shown in this network diagram:

 

 

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-08 16:26:16

@columcille Thanks for that. could i connect from router with ethernet cable to the poe of the eap110

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-08 17:18:21 - last edited 2019-11-08 17:20:57

 

columcille wrote

@columcille Thanks for that. could i connect from router with ethernet cable to the poe of the eap110

 

Yes, of course you can use an Ethernet cable from the EAP's PoE injector (LAN port) to the router. Make sure to use an outdoor patch cable from the PoE injector (PoE port) to the EAP110-Outdoor with proper grounding. I use UBNT ToughCable for connections outdoors, but any other UV-resistant CAT.5e cable with a separate ground wire will do so, too.

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-08 18:10:23

Thank you so much you are a star.

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-09 14:14:33

@columcille Hi, I connected ethernet cable from poe to router but still the same problem, any ideas please.

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-09 19:01:27 - last edited 2019-11-09 19:03:23

columcille wrote

Hi, I connected ethernet cable from poe to router but still the same problem, any ideas please.

 

The correct cabling is:

 

Sky router_LAN-------------LAN_PoE injector_POE-------------POE_EAP110-Outdoor

 

Your router must run a DHCP server (usually all routers do so). To check for, use a laptop and connect it to the LAN port of the Sky router. Check the IP it gets from the router.

 

Then connect the laptop to the LAN port of the PoE injector. Again, check the IP it gets from the router. If this works, the EAP110-Outdoor also will forward DHCP requests/replies wirelessly over the LAN port. Check with the laptop wirelessly connected to the EAP110-Outdoor. If this works, too, the problem is with your smartphone, probably set to static IP instead of DHCP or whatever.

 

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-10 16:29:25

@R1D2 Hi, I got the thing working but all a waste of time. It says on the box range up to 400 meters what a load of rubbish i have eap110 in a straight line with the stable fixed above the gable end of roof. After 50 meters signal starts to fade, by the time it reaches stable 80 meters not enough to run camera. Only option now is to hard wire it. Thanks anyway for your help much appreciated.

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Re:300mbps wireless n outdoor access point extender
2019-11-10 20:05:57 - last edited 2019-11-10 20:37:35

columcille,

 

I never heard of 400m range for an EAP110-Outdoor . EAP110-Outdoor V3 is specified to 200m diameter, that's a radius of 100m (there had been some confusion in the specs for V1 two years ago, but this has been corrected long since then).

 

 

 

Now, if no stable wireless link is working over a distance of 50m, this almost certainly is caused by your client device (at least that's my experience as a professional engineer in the WiFi field with a lot of WiFi outdoor devices including EAP110-Outdoor).

 

People often forget that coverage depends not only on the AP's signal strength, but also on the signal strength of the client device's antenna. The client device needs to send back data to the AP all the time. As an example take the »antenna« of an iPhone or Android smart phone: it's often a piece of metal such as the metal strap around the phone or a small metal plate inside the phone.

 

You won't be able to cover a distance of more than 50-70m outdoors with consumer devices such as smart phones and that coverage is limited by intention by the regulatory authorities, which limit max. signal power by law in every country. I don't know which antennas your cameras use, but if you can't use them over 50m they are definitely not the best antennas.

 

What's more, in 2.4 GHz band there are lot of interferences around, especially in overcrowded places – that's btw the reason why lawmakers restrict the max. signal strength to avoid too much interference and that's why professionals will rather use a 5 GHz device or even a 24 GHz device for long-range directional links which concentrate RF energy in a very small beam over large distances. At the time of allocation of the frequency band for the public the 2.4 GHz band was never meant for directional links.

 

People also underestimate attenuation of electromagnetical waves. Every obstacle between AP and client device will attenuate the signal. Beside walls, trees, rain and snow even plain air is such an obstacle in the world of EM devices. Of course, every EM signal will degrade the longer the distance to the sender is (and again: the AP and client device change the role of the sender every other moment). That's why the signal must degrade in 50m distance. It's just physics, not a crappy device, but physics do behave much worser with a crappy device, which EAP110-Outdoor is not in my opinion.

 

Only exception of this physical rule for EM waves is if you live in outer space, than an EAP110-Outdoor probably covers the area all the way along to planet Mars.

 

As I did recommend in post #4, for a directional link to security cameras I would use a pair of CPE510 (5 GHz band) with an EAP110-Outdoor on the remote site to spread the signal all way around. This is known to work fine, see for example the installation described in this story. But beware: this installation has certain limits too, f.e. the maximum throughput.

 

As can be seen on TP-Link's website, the EAP110-Outdoor is designed to supply an outdoor area such as a yard, a pool or a roof garden. But even then, the ideal mounting place for the AP would be the center of the yard and such an ideal position is used to measure and define the maximum WiFi coverage of a device, no matter from which vendor the device is.

 

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