Basic question on Fibre Internet & EAP 225

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Basic question on Fibre Internet & EAP 225

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Basic question on Fibre Internet & EAP 225
Basic question on Fibre Internet & EAP 225
2022-01-12 13:11:44 - last edited 2022-08-19 12:30:33
Model: EAP225  
Hardware Version:
Firmware Version:

Hello, 

 

I have a basic networking question...

 

My business uses the Omada range and currently gets about 80mbs download. We're currently upgrading to full fibre and should be getting around 900mbs download.

 

The EAP 225 says it supports 300Mbps N - does this mean it won't be able to get the fastest speeds my upgraded broadband will offer?

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Re:Basic question on Fibre Internet & EAP 225-Solution
2022-01-12 18:40:26 - last edited 2022-08-17 13:11:50

@kb2910 

 

Hey and Welcome!

 

I also have 1GB internet here with my Omada so should be able to answer this for you.  

 

The EAP225 is a 1300mbps access point, this means it can support   866mbps on 5Ghz, and 450mbps on 2.4ghz   -   The speed you connect at will depend on the device connecting, example if you have an older laptop that is N Grade (300mpbs as you said post) it will connect to 2.4ghz at 300mbps max..   swop it for a 5ghz AC WiFi card and it should connect at 866mbps.   Hope that makes sense

 

However.. short answer to your question is NO you wont ever get the full 900mbps via wireless, its simply not possible.    Without going into the specifics, the actual real transfer rates for WiFi is around 40 to 50% of the "connected speed".   Therefore if you are connected at 300, then expect speeds around 120-150mbps.    As mentioned earlier the EAP225 can support 866 on a 5ghz connection, that in real terms is around 450mbps.. 

 

Note.. this isn't a fault of Omada or TP-Link, its just how WiFi works in real terms and all manufacturers are the same.  Think of it like MPG in your car, you never get what the manufacturer claims when actually driving.

 

If you go to WiFi6 (802.11AX), you might be able to push this to 600mbps on the 5ghz but sadly that is your limit.    The only way to get the full 900 down from your ISP is via a cabled LAN connection

 

I hope that helps and any questions just drop a reply.

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Re:Basic question on Fibre Internet & EAP 225-Solution
2022-01-12 18:40:26 - last edited 2022-08-17 13:11:50

@kb2910 

 

Hey and Welcome!

 

I also have 1GB internet here with my Omada so should be able to answer this for you.  

 

The EAP225 is a 1300mbps access point, this means it can support   866mbps on 5Ghz, and 450mbps on 2.4ghz   -   The speed you connect at will depend on the device connecting, example if you have an older laptop that is N Grade (300mpbs as you said post) it will connect to 2.4ghz at 300mbps max..   swop it for a 5ghz AC WiFi card and it should connect at 866mbps.   Hope that makes sense

 

However.. short answer to your question is NO you wont ever get the full 900mbps via wireless, its simply not possible.    Without going into the specifics, the actual real transfer rates for WiFi is around 40 to 50% of the "connected speed".   Therefore if you are connected at 300, then expect speeds around 120-150mbps.    As mentioned earlier the EAP225 can support 866 on a 5ghz connection, that in real terms is around 450mbps.. 

 

Note.. this isn't a fault of Omada or TP-Link, its just how WiFi works in real terms and all manufacturers are the same.  Think of it like MPG in your car, you never get what the manufacturer claims when actually driving.

 

If you go to WiFi6 (802.11AX), you might be able to push this to 600mbps on the 5ghz but sadly that is your limit.    The only way to get the full 900 down from your ISP is via a cabled LAN connection

 

I hope that helps and any questions just drop a reply.

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