Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor

Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor

Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-08 20:59:49 - last edited 2023-10-09 00:51:16

Hello,

 

For one of my client, I need to provide the wifi to cover an entire vehicle fleet (approximative size 100 m x 30 m).

I have already installed on a metal hollow LED lighting pole a Cradlepoint W2005 - 5GB at around 15ft height and the access point EAP 610 on the same pole at around 25ft height.

I need to get a stronger wifi signal and I am thinking of adding a EAP 610 mesh on a different metal hollow LED lighting pole.

 

Here are my questions:

 

- How can I supply power to the EAP 610 outdoor mesh using a solar panel without a battery?

Is a solar panel 50 Watt 12 Volt + Power converter regulator 12V to 48V + TP-LINK 802.3af Gigabit PoE Injector 48V + EAP 610 outdoor 48V would work?

 

If you had the same technical problem and could share some of your experiences that would be awesome!

 

Thanks a lot

Best,

 

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#1
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8 Reply
Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-09 01:44:58

  @RVCD 

 

Hi, you have a misunderstanding between input and output, the Power converter regulator shouldn't transfer 12V to 48V but 12V to 100~240V so that it can power on the POE adapter first.

Just striving to develop myself while helping others.
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#2
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-09 15:07:15

Hi @Virgo,

 

Thanks a lot for you answer back.

 

In my case, I do not have access to a regular AC power supply.

So, I do need to use a solar panel so that the PoE injector I was thinking to use is a PoE injector TL-POE150S that has a 48VDC power input port.

 

 

 

So, my set-up to supply power to the EAP 610 outdoor would be to have a 12V solar panel (25W) + Converter regulator 12VDC to 48VDC 3A + TL-POE150S injector 48VDC + EAP 610 outdoor.

 

If I am not misundertanding your thought, is that set-up can be a good installation?

 

Thanks a lot.

 

 

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#3
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-10 02:41:33

  @RVCD 

 

I don't think the TL-POE150S can supply the power to the EAP610-Outdoor, EAP610-OD need be powered by 802.3at POE, but 150S only supports 802.3af.

 

 

 

Maybe the TL-POE160S is OK, but also needs the 100-240 V input.

Just striving to develop myself while helping others.
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#4
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-10 07:43:22

  @RVCD 

RVCD wrote

Hi @Virgo,

 

Thanks a lot for you answer back.

 

In my case, I do not have access to a regular AC power supply.

So, I do need to use a solar panel so that the PoE injector I was thinking to use is a PoE injector TL-POE150S that has a 48VDC power input port.

 

 

 

 

So, my set-up to supply power to the EAP 610 outdoor would be to have a 12V solar panel (25W) + Converter regulator 12VDC to 48VDC 3A + TL-POE150S injector 48VDC + EAP 610 outdoor.

 

If I am not misundertanding your thought, is that set-up can be a good installation?

 

Thanks a lot.

 

 

 

tp-link products, the adapter, input is 100-240v ac. 

48V input in the picture means it 802.1 poe is 48V. not the adapter input. you should figure this out. you should use a converter to convert your dc to ac.

ScReW yOu gUyS. I aM GOinG hoMe. —————————————————————— For heaven's sake, can you write and describe your issue based on plain fact, common logic and a methodologic approach? Appreciate it.
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#5
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-10 13:00:28

  @RVCD 

 

You can't use solar power without a battery and a charge controller.  The battery isn't there for 24/7 use, so it doesn't have to be huge, it's there to provide buffer for the electrical conversion process.  The Panel will put out a variable voltage based on the solar input, you need a relatively stable -48V if you are doing direct POE power which I recommend using a DC-DC boost converter rather than converting to high voltage AC and then back to DC.

<< Paying it forward, one juicy problem at a time... >>
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#6
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-10 16:27:00

Thanks @Virgo!

 

This is going to be very helpful to have the good specs for the right products and set-up!

 

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#7
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-10 16:43:02

Thanks a lot @d0ugmac1!

 

I do think I am getting close of the right set-up for my solar panel installation.

 

If I have well understood, I will go with the Solar panel 12VDC 25W + DC-DC Boost converter 12V to 48V + TP-LINK 802.3af Gigabit PoE Injector 48V + EAP 610 outdoor 48V. 

 

Here I am little confused.

Should I use a DC-DC Boost converter 12V-48V instead of a charge controller?

I guess the 12V DC battery has to be plugged on the DC-DC boost converter?

 

Thanks!

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#8
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Re:Supply power to an access point mesh EAP 610 outdoor
2023-10-10 19:20:11

  @RVCD 

 

Honestly, it would probably be WAY easier to work on cleaning up the LED lighting power (filter it mostly) than to go solar, but since you asked:

 

As below, but with 1 panel, 1 battery, 1 charge controller and the DC-AC converter would be whatever solution you choose to use to create POE.

Also note that there should be fuses between the battery and the solar cells and load.

 

You need to size the solar cell(s) and battery based on hours of operation, system efficiency, and load draw.

 

Let's say you have an AP that consumes 25W on average and it needs to operate for 8hrs a day.

Let's assume your POE power conversion is 90% efficient.

You need 25x8/0.9 = 225Whr of power (more actually because you don't really want to start and stop with the battery being flat).

225Whr of power at 12V nominal is about 20Ah (already a pretty chunky battery)

Assuming you get at least 8 hours of quality sunlight a day, you'll need a 30W panel, lots of rain or northern latitude?, probably want to go to 50-100W to make up for lost solar conversion efficiency.  Anyways... you get the idea.

 

 

you could use something like this to convert your solar/battery to decent POE

 

 

 

 

<< Paying it forward, one juicy problem at a time... >>
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