Can routers operate as a "pure" switch?

Can routers operate as a "pure" switch?
Can routers operate as a "pure" switch?
2022-04-28 04:03:49

Hi

 

Recently, I configure a spare Lynksys router to work like a switch by doing the followings:

  1. Give the wireless router (access point/switch) an ip address on the same network as DHCP server (router).
  2. Disable DHCP, DNS, and firewall.
  3. Plug in to one of the 4 LAN ports (not WAN or Internet port).

With this configuration, the Linksys router works similar to a switch. So Are routers = switches with extra features?

Since routers and switches operate at different layers, is it correct to assume, even with the configuration above, that routers are still dealing with packets and IP routing while switches deal with MAC address/Frames?

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Re:Can routers operate as a "pure" switch?
2022-04-28 05:56:44

  @SalinaSJames 

 

You could configure almost any home router to work this way - it's called access point mode.

And the answer on your both questions is: Yes.

While switches work on Layer 2, the routers work on Layer 2 & 3.

When you disable router's Layer 3 functionality it becomes Layer 2 only device i.e.works like a switch.

Here's the difference between router and AP  mode for TP-Link devices.

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Re:Can routers operate as a "pure" switch?
2022-05-05 08:24:34

  @SalinaSJames 

I got a call from a remote office that most of their computers were down. Switches were up and running ports were lit up, but no PC connectivity. I can't remote to any of them either. Servers were just fine. So I get one of the people on the phone and I have them do an ipconfig /all. They are all getting 192.168.0.x addresses. This isn't a subnet we used anywhere. I said, did anyone plug a router in at your office? Naturally "nobody" did. After investigation I narrowed down which switch port it was and I could see one active computer there. Go over to that area and look for one. "No there's no router here". Uh huh. Find where the cable connects to the wall, and follow it to the pc. "Oh hey, behind the desk there's one." An entire mornings productivity lost for an office because a rogue router was handing out DHCP. (There are ways to prevent this if your infrastructure supports it.)

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