Ceiling fan switch

Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-01-26 04:02:01

@Tony 

TP-Link is missing the boat by not having a ceiling fan speed with a light dimmer switch or a dimmable 3-way light in their suite of products.  I was hoping to see the ceiling fan speed with light dimmer announced with the dimmable 3-way light switch.  Since there is a no plans, I will try out Treatlife as it has a similar look and feel and doesn't require a hub either.

 

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#52
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-02-05 00:57:19
MrD., any chance you tried the HS220 dimmable switch to see if that works on the ceiling fan? Nice to know I can use the HS200 as we rarely change the speeds on the fans.
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#53
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-02-05 16:43:27 - last edited 2021-02-05 16:59:34

@RGC I have thought about this, and I think it is a fair question. But the main issue is whether or not this switch can handle the power (amps and voltage, aka Wattage) load of a ceiling fan at different speeds, as the dimmer would have to restrict the power going to the fan in order to control it's speed. I am unfamiliar with how ceiling fan switches really work (the ones installed in the fan themselves). It could be really simple like I am thinking, but it could be much more complicated than just limiting power. I do seem to remember that many fans have a dumb three-way swtich that interfaces wiht a control module that in turn controls the speed of the fan. I've seen people on Amazon say that these can control fans, and I have seen others say that they have had problems dimming more than one bulb. The latter report is concerning to me. That may be an anomaly, but it doesn't sound too far fetched given what I understand about the switch (if my understanding is accurate).

Even if it is as simple as limiting the power to the fan in order to slow it down (or raising the power to make it speed up), the electronics inside the wall switch need to be able to handle that amount of power (or more specifically, that amount of current which is amerpage). I am fairly certain but not completely positive that the simple on/off switches (HS200)  are rated to be able to handle the amount of current that a ceiling fan needs, which is why I haven't installed them on my bathroom fans or other ceiling fans. This is the reason we have been asking TP-Link to release a switch that is rated to handle that kind of power load safely. 

 

Thinking through this, given that an HS200 is a typical 15A switch, and in light of that fact that most home lighting and celining fans operate safely on 15A circuits and switches, it makes sense to me that using an HS200 to simply turn the fan on and off would be safe. It might be totally ok to use as a simple on/off switches for a fan. That is what makes sense to me. That being said, I am not an electrician, and I am not only not giving advice; nor am I even sure that my understanding is accurate, which is why I am hesitant to install them for my own fans. Along with that, even if it is safe to install the HS200 for fans, controlling power delivery to the fan using a dimmer (HS220),  while it sounds simple to me in theory, may be more complicated than I understand, particularly when it comes to delivering power to a ceiling fan motor. I would think, and I would hope, it was as easy as setting the fan on high and then just lowering or raising the amerage to the fan.  But even then, the dimmer switch needs to be contrsucted in such away that it can hand the modulation of the current safely. And those are answers I just don't have and am not willing to risk it without some assurance from TP-Link.

 

The FAQ for the HS220 states: " It is not allowed to plug any electrical appliance whose power exceeds the Kasa plug's maximum load and power, otherwise it would cause some safety issue or even a conflagration. Please also note some devices have very high peak current when it powers on and that high peak current would also damage the smart plug;"

 

This emphasizes my concern about its ability to handle the power requirements of a ceiling fan as there could be high current peaks at times. If ceiling fan motors are similar to other motors, they draw more power when they stifled in their aiblity to turn (like a vaccum cleaner draws more current when you clog or limit the free flow of air). So starting a ceiling fan could create a very high current draw (as it builds momentum, it draws more current, particularly at intial point of power on), or if something for some reason stopped the blades (or made it harder for them to turn, like high humidity), could make the fan motor draw more power. If the HS200 or HS220 is not rated to compensate for those peak currents, you could damage the device. That is my basic understanding of it, though ceiling fan motors and control boxes may have safety mechanisms built in to mitigate this issue, but I am not sure because that goes well beyond my understanding about the construction and built-in safetys of ceiling fans. 

 

Again, this is why need they need to release a device that is rated for controling ceiling fans. There is clearly a demand for it. And it is perplexing why they have not done so already, particularly in light of the fact that other companies have. 

 

Hey TP-Link! Let's give it a go!!

 

Dan

 

 

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#54
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-03-16 00:31:55

@ZioJim @Upshaw @RGC 

@Upshaw - your assessment of the HS200 for just on/off of the fan also is what I was thinking that it would be safe just for on/off, but I too am not an electrician. I saw this video where the guy hooked up the HS200 to his fan and it works and he also states the same reason as the 15A rating using the single pole switch (https://youtu.be/Tsv-3g3SCX8). My need for 2 fans is simply to do on/off and would be nice to just use the HS200 switch to do so.

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#55
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-05-10 18:37:17

@Tony 

I have 3 houses that would use an average of 6 in each house.  That is 18 more.  I would like to keep it in the Tp-link family instead of going to Treatlife and having to switch between apps.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Ceiling-Control-Treatlife-Assistant-Schedule/dp/B086PPRWL7/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=ceiling+fan+switch&qid=1620671770&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzQk5VWThSWEVKNjY5JmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNzczMzE5RDM4QUlMMEhOMktWJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTAzNDc4MjA2RzZBNjY5R0czOU4md2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGYmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl

 

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#56
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-05-18 19:28:40 - last edited 2021-05-18 19:36:48

@Tony 

Come on TP-Link, this thread is more than 2 years old with a lot of traffic. Other manufacturers (e.g. TreatLife) are leaving you in the dust with their innovations. I like your switches but your offering is not enough any more to beat few-year-old competitors. A ceiling fan switch with speed control and a 2-in-1 fan/light control is on my wish list (both of which offered by other manufacturers). I don't see how this could mean any challenge to your engineers. It only needs some attention from product planning.

 

Community, make your voice heard! Keep commenting to raise attention.

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#57
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-06-05 19:18:10

@ZioJim +1 for a fan control switch

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#58
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-06-06 13:29:53
Agreed, a ceiling fan switch would be very welcomed by this TP-Link Kasa fan!
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#59
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-06-17 15:00:09

Adding myself to the list requesting a ceiling fan switch with speed control in the TP Link ecosystem.  I'd be in for 2.

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#60
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Re:Ceiling fan switch
2021-07-02 18:25:40

@MrD. I cannot get my HS200 to control my ceiling fan. When I hook the two wires from the original switch to two black wires on kasa, I get an immediate rapid flashing green light. Faster than the green light looking for WiFi. The fan operates, but not at the speed it does with old two pole switch

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#61
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