Smart plug consumption measures ?

Smart plug consumption measures ?
Smart plug consumption measures ?
2022-05-04 07:31:00 - last edited 2022-05-20 10:50:26

Hi

 

Anybody has an idea of smart plugs consumption ? I was wondering if it would be wise to put smart plugs on any devices that is using energy while on standby mode (tv, boiler, washing machine,...), but if a smart plug is also using energy this could be useless echat.date , so I’m looking for numbers so that I can compare and see what would be the gain to switch off energy to the end device.

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#1
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Re:Smart plug consumption measures ?
2022-05-05 03:17:36

Hello   @BettyVeronicasi 

Tapo Smart plug also consume small amount of power when relay is OFF to be active from APP, here is similar topic discussing the energy it used Re:Tapo P100 smart plug power consumption-Solution

If the home appliance that  has standby mode, plug could only cut off power/ give power to the device, we need to manually turn on device by pressing the control/ button. 

 

 

 

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Re:Smart plug consumption measures ?
3 weeks ago

  @BettyVeronicasi 

 

The P110 smart plug on standby mode (relay off) with a good wifi signal uses 0.6-0.7W.

 

(Source: plugging a P110 into another P110)

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Re:Smart plug consumption measures ?
3 weeks ago - last edited 3 weeks ago

Such smart plugs help save electricity and control the room's total voltage, but it is worth considering that it is not always effective. A week ago, my refrigerator burned out this way. I thought it was already impossible to fix it, but when I contacted https://musiccityappliance.services/ , they repaired it in just two days, and now everything works fine, but I no longer use such plugs. They also consume additional energy, so there are no savings from them.

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Re:Smart plug consumption measures ?
Wednesday - last edited Wednesday

  @Hassang If you really want to monitor consumption over a long time, I think there is no other choice.

 

e.g. I have a bunch of servers that I want to rent out to customers.

Yes, they have a 1000W power supply unit, but perhaps they only use 200W.

There are peaks, there are lows, ... to get a full overview you need to measure and store data.

 

And I've seen open-source projects that help to actually read out the data of the Tapo device,

so that we can store it in a database.

 

That summarizes my motivation to invest in these affordable devices.

 

 

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But yes, for home users. If you want to cut down on your electricity bill, you should indeed be looking at refrigerators, heaters, 

but also at televisions, displays, computers, ... Those devices often use >100W.

And once you have an estimation, you no longer need it. Calculate once, and you're good.

 

And I don't completely disagree with you. For home users perhaps this devices is less attractive.

Then again, homes are starting to look more and more like little factories.

Our homes are filled with devices, and we are more and more dependent on the price of electricity.

So, even for homes, monitoring your cost of living isn't crazy, is it?

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