Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool

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Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool

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Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-25 20:34:03
Model: Archer AX1800  
Hardware Version: V1
Firmware Version: 1.2.0 Build 20201023 rel.69987(5553)

I've done this on other tp-link routers since I have cameras that I want to get to regardless of my location in the world. In the past I would set the DHCP server pool to a range of 50 to 139. I would out my cameras and other items I wanted to be static IP's above 139 or below 50 and everything was good. My C9 just to a dump on the wifi side and I replaced it with this AX 1800 and when I tried to set up my address reservation list outside of the server pool the set up page gives me an error and says it's outside of the server pool. 

 

If I try and trick it by setting the server pool to 35 - 254 set my addresses up and then reset the pool to 50 - 139 which the router setup page let's me do I couldn't reach any of the items or cameras below 50 and above 139. I emailed tech support and I didn't get an answer that made any sence and link to the instructions, which I've read. 

 

Right now I have the DHCP server pool set at 50 to 254 and I have my DT computer IP which is wired, set to obtain an IP address automatically and set the MAC address reservation in the router set at 40 and that does work, but the wireless devices no joy. 

 

As I've said that is how I've always setup my reservation list and server pool with my other tp link routers, if fact the temporary Archer A8 I used until I got the new one I had the reservation/server pool set up that way. 

 

Any ideas on the issue? 

 

Thanks Dennis

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#1
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6 Reply
Re:Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-26 21:11:40
I have my reservations inside the pool with all my other devices and have not had any issues with it on my Archer C8 as well as my previous router. What is the reason for putting them outside of the pool?
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#2
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Re:Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-27 13:35:05

@ArcherC8 

I've always done that to make sure I don't have collisions. Right now I have about 25 wifi wall switches, 4 Alexa devices, 8 cameras with fixed IP's, a CP 210 on the house with a fixed IP broadcasting a signal across my property to another building with CPE 210 with a fixed IP on the front of a metal building connected to a wireless router (With a fixed IP) inside the building. That being said, I can't/don't want collisions so everything works correctly.

 

So I would put the cameras, the CPE 210's, the the access point router in the other building and some other devices with fixed address's outside of the DHCP server pool. Right now I have to set the server pool in a range of 50 to 254.  

 

Hopefully that makes sense. 

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#3
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Re:Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-27 16:39:35
I have not had an issue with collisions. My assigned range is 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199 and when I made my first address reservation, I used 119. As I added devices to the reservation list I used higher numbers. Then I noted when I exceeded 19 devices, the router assigned numbers without a collision. I assigned one device as 101 and no collision. I rebooted the router each time I added new reservations,
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#4
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Re:Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-28 22:06:08 - last edited 2020-12-28 22:06:47

@DrL  I could be mis-reading this but reservations exist even if the device isn't connected so the DHCP server won't give out an IP if a reservation exists EVEN if that device has not requested an IP.

 

This actually makes sense for having all three possiblities functoning at once

 

A network range , ex 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.254

A DHCP server range  192.168.1.10 - 192.168.1.254

 

1. Give a device an ip manually that is outside the DHCP server range

2. Make a reservation for a device within the DHCP range

3. No reservation

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#5
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Re:Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-29 14:26:52

@braxton  Correct, except for some reason this router won't let me make a reservation outside of a DHCP server range 192.168.1.10 - 192.168.1.254. All the other routers have let me add items to the server range. While it might not sound like a big deal, my question is, why could I do it on all the other tp-link routers and this one will not. If it because of the design intent? That's really my question. When the wifi of my other router quit working I had a Archer A8 sitting in a box that I will be using for another house/project down the street and I could set that DHCP ranges up exactly how I've in the past not an issue.  

 

I know how to get around it and I've done it, just questioning why can't set up the DHCP reservation list like I have in the past on the.

 

Another quirk I've run into. As I said I got a number of wifi switches and plugs from a number of different manufactures. I was personally testing to find out which ones were the easiest to get up and running without having to jump through a bunch of hoops. I have one particular manufactures plugs lose connectivity with the new network router at various times of the day and night. Sometimes it would reconnect, other times I had to unplug it, plug it back in and it would reconnect, worse case I had to go though and reprogram it again. The purpose of the plus and switches is to have them turn devices on and off either by command via the app, Alexa, or Alexa routines. If they go off line when I'm not home or out of town they can't provide the function I got them for to begin with. 

 

I have had these plugs for about a year and half and have never had any connectivity issues with my old router, did not have any issues with the temporary router I was using.

 

Anyways, I contacted the manufacture of the plugs about this. I removed the plugs and had them plugged into a plug strip so I could see when they lost connection with the network, In the meantime the one in question reconnected so the manufacture could not see the problem. FYI From that statement it is obvious that the manufacture can see if their plug is online and correctly working no matter where it it…….

 

What I tried next was when the plugs were connected to the network and operating correctly, I ran an IP scan on my network and got the MAC address of the plugs I was having problems with. Then I added them to the DHCP reservation list in consecutive addresses to make sure the router would not change their address. Guess what, no more problems and the switches have worked properly, and I have reconnected them to the devices they were controlling.

 

While I found a fix, why did I see that issue? Next point to be made, would the average person who does not have any type of networking experience or knowledge have been able to figure that out and fix it? Or is it just this router and it should be returned to Amazon where I go it?

 

I was hoping someone else with one of these routers might jump in.

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#6
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Re:Trying to set Address reservation outside of the DHCP server pool
2020-12-29 17:33:00 - last edited 2020-12-29 17:35:16

@DrL I don't have that router but maybe they were having trouble with renewing the IP? Maybe check the DHCP server logs if you can to see what  is happening. Something that might help in the future (as you've already given them leases) is to increase the DHCP lease time to 7 days,  not sure what your default is but with so few devices being added and removed in a residental setting there's no need to keep the lease time low.

 

- About the manufactor being able to communicate with the plugs: Yes, unfortunatly the plugs and the app are communicating through their servers to each other This makes it easier to setup and allows for you to access them when you are away from the network.  This gives the company full access to your network. I believe Zigbee and Philips Hue (which can be set up for cloud access) are the only ones now that are local. *not sure about this*

 

- As to routers being a pain the ass: Everyone needs help, there's always some problem. You return this router because of a connection issue with smart plugs, you buy an Asus, next thing you know your wifi will reboot every 6 hours. There's always some little thing here or there that causes issues. I don't know what they are using now but my c5400 (3 years old~) uses a modified OpenWRT, It's basically Linux.  Things have gotten so complicated and that's probably why weird things crop up.

 

I've owned several tplink routers over the last decade. I switched from Linksys because tp-link is a really good value for the price, you get really impressive hardware for the money. Their software is ok, could be better, but it's a good company. 

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#7
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